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yoraffetto

Lake WHAT?!?

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Earlier today, I was looking at some nautical charts of the Ship Channel. In particular, this one. Then I noticed a very strange name for a lake. Checked Google Maps. Same name. Would have guessed this would have been renamed by now.

Lake 1.jpg

Lake 2.jpg

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I am well aware of this body of water.  It was named that many years ago.  The word negro is not a derogatory term, even though PC folks would like us to think it is.

 

Negro: a member of a dark-skinned group of peoples originally native to Africa south of the Sahara.

Edited by Baytown Bert
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I hope you took a look at the statement above "noun" where it says "dated offensive".  One can find a lot of other words that are also considered offensive, but would seem to have legitimate definitions.

Modern usage issues are not simply PC or not PC.  The connotations of words frequently change with time.  In some cases the actual definitions change.

I was surprised to learn many years ago (when I was in college) that a term that I had grown up using was considered to be offensive to the group of people that it described by a member of that group.  I asked what term I should use, and was told, and I said that that term was more ambiguous.  I was assured that it was not offensive, and the term that I had used was offensive, so I stopped using it.

If by appropriate word choice I can avoid offending someone, then I think that I should do so.

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What if it said Indianhead lake, would that be offensive to anyone?  I am not for a wholesale renaming of everything every 50 years because folks are currently offended.

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If someone tells me that they are offended, I'm going to believe them.  I don't get to decide what offends them; I only get to decide what offends me.

If that, in turn, means that it is appropriate to rename something (because a group of people are offended), then so be it.  I would just hope that as people decide to rename things that they pick new names that are likely to not offend someone in just a few years.

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All arguments stated are a matter of personal opinion.

My personal opinion on the matter is: "why rename anything?"

If it didn't have that historical reference, albeit negative, then this conversation wouldn't exist.

Simply "erasing" the past isn't going to change it.

I think it's healthy to find out more about a subject and names can spark that inquisitive nature to know more.

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History is history and even if that body of water was renamed, someone would still remember it being called that. With the internet being so easily accessible just a quick search on google we can pull up any history we want.

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I suspect the name was changed in 1962 by the U.S. Board on Geographic names.

I still think if a name offends a group of people, it ought to be changed.  Besides, what is the down side?

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Correction may be needed here but wasn't Battleground Rd recently renamed Independence Pkwy?  Why on Earth? Speaking of Earth...google doesn't update every time someone pulls a fit and has something renamed.  

 

 

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2008 

Discussion of a new name began when the county reached an agreement with the Texas Department of Transportation to take over responsibility for Battleground Road, which leads from 225 through San Jacinto State Park to the Lynchburg Ferry, and for Crosby-Lynchburg Road, which runs from Interstate 10 to the ferry. In exchange, the county received an overgrown piece of state property near Broadway and Loop 610 that Precinct 2 Commissioner Sylvia Garcia hopes to turn into a park.

Crosby-Lynchburg Road also is defunct, renamed Independence Parkway North. A spokesman for Garcia said safety improvements are planned for both sections of the 4-mile road, as well as cosmetic changes to incorporate it into Project Stars, a broad effort within the San Jacinto Texas Historic District to promote historic tourism.

Edited by Baytown Bert

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I am not sure about global warming or who invented the internet but the US is suffering from a really bad case of ThinSkinItis along with an acute case of MEopia. IMHO

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I started to write a response to this.  Then I thought perhaps I shouldn't--it might just be fanning some flames that will otherwise die down.  But then I decided that I need to respond.

Given the level of racism in this country recently, I'm not about to suggest that those who are offended by racist comments are out of line, overly sensitive or whatever.  As I said earlier, if someone says they are offended, I am going to believe them.

When making statements on social media (which I often refer to as "asocial media"), I tend to soften my language.  I tend to qualify things by saying "I think" or "In my opinion".  But this is one that I am not going to soften.  

Using racist terms to describe geographical features is offensive.

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I too believe that "offensive" is determined by individuals. And, I believe it our right to be offended by anything we wish to call offensive.

But, it is the effect, reaction, or remedy "imposed" on us at times where I sometimes get rubbed into a rash. Sometimes, I roll my eyes, but other times I feel like we go too far, mostly in the name of PC Police that amount to nothing more than bullies. These bullies tend to be well educated people that live in the Op Ed's making a hobby of stirring change to amuse themselves. I have met some of these folks, and there are many more than you might think. Many times it's a game to them, slef-righteously speaking for the unknowing apathetic and silent majority. Man, I hate bullies. 

My greatest concern is where the line gets drawn sometimes, but mostly I get scared to death over who gets to draw those lines...

Nude Art Sculptures or Paintings offend many, and so does Mark Twain, and the image of Robert E. Lee, or Abe Lincoln. It must be tricky to be named Richard on the play ground these days, and just how did slang for a restroom derive from a biblical disciple? Now add foreign languages to the mix and even the color black seems to catch a glance, not to mention hundreds of other words that hurt somebody somewhere. As a collective, this age of PC has really gotten to be offensive to me at this point. I do wish people would just chill.    

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I guess the folks at the United Negro College Fund need an attitude adjustment.  Damn racists...

Just don't call me "white" or "Caucasian", it offends me.  I prefer the term "European American". :coolsmiley:

 

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22 minutes ago, HoustonControl said:

I guess the folks at the United Negro College Fund need an attitude adjustment.  Damn racists...

Just don't call me "white" or "Caucasian", it offends me.  I prefer the term "European American". :coolsmiley:

 

"youreapee'n murican"? Congratulations! 

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What is really sad is that we jumped to the word negro referring to a man of color. This area was settled by the Spanish first and the word Negro means black. I am sure the "name" for this was originally "Black Lake". I bet if we searched carefully we would find a lake within a hundred miles called Blanco Lake.

Sent from TDW's iPhone using Tapatalk

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But sadly in the area there are places that are named "negrohead" hill, mountain, lake and so on, and those names were probably changed in 1962.  I doubt that they were originally named just for the dark color of the ground or the rock formations.  I think it is likely that they were named to be descriptive primarily of shape and the people that named them for the most part didn't mean anything bad by the name.  However, word connotations change in a living language.  There are people who are offended by these terms.  Our country has a history of changing geographic place names that people find offensive.  I provided a link in my earlier message.

Sadly, to me, there are those that want to belittle and make fun of individuals' sense of being offended by overtly racist terms.

This thread started with yoraffetto's observation of a surprising name on a geographic feature, and it prompted a defense of the term with a statement that "The word negro is not a derogatory term" and a quote from a dictionary.  However that dictionary entry was labelled as "dated offensive".  From there we launched off in a number of directions mostly addressing how people respond to offensive language and how we respond to people who are offended by something.

I affirm and promote the inherent worth and dignity of every person, and justice, equity and compassion in human relations (among other principles).  This is why I felt that I should not remain quiescent.

I will repeat once again--If someone tells me that they are offended, I'm going to believe them.  I don't get to decide what offends them; I only get to decide what offends me.

By the way, the United Negro College Fund have considered changing their name--they mostly no longer use the actual name and instead they use the acronym UNCF and have since 2008.

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I agree with you up to the point where we start re-writing and changing history. Then again our society apparently hasn't learned much from history as we're doomed in repeating it. So I guess it doesn't really even matter but it does make me sad.

However I try real hard to respect folks sensibilities when it comes to them personally. I can't help them if they're offended by something that happened in the past and has historical value. That's their problem and no one should have to cater to that. 

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Is there some historically noteworthy event associated with the lake in question? 

I am certainly not suggesting that "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" be rewritten or edited to remove offensive language.  To do so would remove some of our history.  That novel is a product of its time and the time that it depicts.  I am not upset about (but admittedly have not read) "Go Set a Watchman".  From what I have heard about the novel, it describes how Atticus Finch is a product of his time.  I can understand how people are disappointed with the character (and have transferred that disappointment to the author)--I think they attributed something to this character in "To Kill a Mockingbird" that isn't actually there.  I wouldn't suggest that either novel be rewritten or edited.

If I am correct that the name of this lake was changed in 1962 by the U.S. Board on Geographic Names because it was offensive, if people are now offended by the "improved" name, I see no reason not to change it again.

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