Getting to Know Your Fellow Cachers: What are you reading? Fiction

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What book inspired you to be what who you are now?

 

 I remember being really inspired by James Herriot books when I was a kid.  I thought I wanted to be a country veterinarian like he was.  Then experience taught me that I was a better as an "animal advocate".  I think sometimes it is more the world around you that shapes you rather than books, although we do frame the way we see the world from what we read as well.

 

Lately, I have noticed the books that were so important to me in my "formative years" getting ripped to shreds by people's opinions on book review sites or Reddit, and it makes me wonder if I only THOUGHT they were good books because of where I was, mental/emotionally, at the time of reading them.  The stuff that seems SO important when we are in our late teens and early twenties kinda seems not as meaningful when you go back and read it in your thirties.  These are the books that "made me what I am" based on how important their ideas were when I was young, but possibly would be invalidated now:

 

Zen and The Art of Motorcycle Maintenance:  Robert Pirsig

On the Road:  Jack Kerouac

The Fountainhead:  Ayn Rand

Anything by Tom Robbins, but mostly Even Cowgirls Get the Blues and Another Roadside Attraction

Edited by JustKeely
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I'm right with you on the first three. Reread "Zen..." a few years ago and it holds up.

Edited by bbqbob2

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Well I got on this Reddit thread yesterday that was trashing that novel, basically saying the narrator was coming across as pretentious, overly explaining basic principles, was not really saying anything anyone didn't already know, was not making any sense, calling it "new-agey quasi-intellectual" with no real point to it  - it has been a long time since I read it so I wasn't sure if I would have the same experience.  I am glad to hear you still liked it, because it does have a place in my heart.  And, redditors hate everything anyways....so I shouldn't take them too seriously.

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A book that I finished reading recently was Dashiel Hammet's The Maltese Falcon.  I enjoyed the movie many years ago but became interested in the book when doing multi in San Francisco that was dedicated to it.  The book references several real world places in downtown SF and the multi-cache takes you to some of them.  It was fun reading the book knowing exactly where they were talking about.  The book is pretty good too, even better if you read it in a crime noir "voice".  

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Enjoyed "Under The Dome", Jason, its well thought out and had a lot of surprises. Good read and a good recommendation.

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I just finished reading *Cider House Rules*.  The book was so good, how do I follow up with another *GREAT*?

 

Any suggestions?

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Some things I have read recently that I really enjoyed:

 

The Poisonwood Bible

The Red Tent

 

Most recently I read this book "Freedom" by Jonathon Frazen.  I thought the characters were captivating but my best friend read it along with me and thought they were a bunch of whiny babies, so possibly I am not that discerning.

 

Right now I am reading this book called "The World Without Us" by Alan Weisman.  I think it is not-exactly-fiction-not-exactly nonfiction.  It's a look at evolutionary history of the earth in order to predict what a future would be like in this world if humans were to disappear.  It is the most interesting book I have read in a while.  

 

I read both books and loved them both!  Great choices!! :-)

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I just finished reading *Cider House Rules*.  The book was so good, how do I follow up with another *GREAT*?

 

Any suggestions?

 

The easiest thing would be to read anything else by John Irving. He is always readable and interesting. Try Garp, Owen Meany, Widow for One Year, Fourth Hand and Twisted River, can't go wrong.

 

Keely and I both mentioned Cutting for Stone earlier in the thread and it is fantastic. Also Little Bee that Keely cited is a great book. And 1000 White Women is surprisingly entertaining.

 

Those should keep you busy for awhile.

georeyna and KeyResults like this

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I just finished reading *Cider House Rules*.  The book was so good, how do I follow up with another *GREAT*?

 

Any suggestions?

 

The easiest thing would be to read anything else by John Irving. He is always readable and interesting. Try Garp, Owen Meany, Widow for One Year, Fourth Hand and Twisted River, can't go wrong.

 

Keely and I both mentioned Cutting for Stone earlier in the thread and it is fantastic. Also Little Bee that Keely cited is a great book. And 1000 White Women is surprisingly entertaining.

 

Those should keep you busy for awhile.

 

Thanks Sandy,

 

I was preparing to purchase Owen Meany yesterday, on sale for 1.99 on Kindle.  I think I will stay on the John Irving train for a while and also read the other suggested books.  I really love his writing style.  Thank you so much Sandy!!  :cheers:   I will have to look up Cutting Stone!!

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I just finished Where the Red Fern. Grows with my son and cried my eyes out for the millionth time. I also wanted to pipe in my agreement with John Irving books which are always entertaining. Earlier this year I finished the Game of Thrones series and it was ungodly long but very engrossing. I am waiting for my next crack installment of thrones so i started reading HP's Order of the Phoenix in German which makes me very sleepy when I read it.

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I just finished Cached Out by Russell Atkinson. I think he captured the geocaching spirit Pretty well. Good read.

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I'm almost finished with a Patricia Cornwell novel "Cause of Death".  

I had to chuckle when it was describing the super fast, state of the art, computer system of a 486 Turbo, with dual floppy drives....

I thumbed back to the publication page, and saw that it was written in 1996.  

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