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Kayak Accident in Missouri City

23 posts in this topic

Posted · Report post

I just saw on KHOU 11 News where a man and his adult daughter capsized in a kayak on a lake in Missouri City and were injured. The helicopter shot showed a red sit-on tandem kayak floating on the water. The report said that both were in the hospital and that the father was in critical condition. My first thought was it might be at Buffalo Run Park where the Beginner's Kayak Series is, and I hoped it wasn't someone geocaching, but the online report says it was in American Legion Park.

http://www.khou.com/news/local/Father-daughter-rescued-after-kayak-accident-in-Missouri-City--185712882.html

It appears to be here.

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Posted · Report post

Oh my...hope the dad turns out to be ok!!

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Posted · Report post

They never say in the news story how it happened. I wonder if they were kayaking without PFDs and couldn't swim when they capsized. It's ironic that the cache that shows up nearby is called "Know Your Limit". I hope that they will be ok.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

The lake is a big one. I have never seen anyone kayak in it. The lake is stocked with rainbow trout every year so there are usually a few fisherman around. the cache is mine and the name refers to the limit of 5 rainbow trout/day but I have never caught even one in that lake.

If the final position of the kayak is where they fell into the water it is very far from where the fisherman fish.

Edited by SockPuppet

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Posted · Report post

So vague. I wonder if he was wearing a PFD.

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Posted · Report post

Maybe it's because I've had 36 years of safety meetings and wear Nomex, steel toed boots, hard hat, safety glasses, and ear plugs 12 hours a day at work, plus wear my safety belt religiously that I always wear a PFD when I'm on the water and a helmet when I'm truly off-raod on my bike.

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Posted · Report post

This is basicaly across the street from where I live. I saw the helicopters and fire trucks on the way home on Friday.

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Posted · Report post

This is very sad on so many levels.

As an avid Kayak Fisherman, I'm thinking a siezure, massive heart attack, blown embolism, or similar, turtled the yak, kid helpless, water swallowed, hypothermia, shock. It doesn't take long for bad things to happen, especially in the Winter.

It's small consolation that when our maker calls us in this way, it's better on yak on a lake than oncoming traffic at rush hour in behind the wheel 18-wheeler. Hey, it happens everyday somewhere. Sounds like the kid was physically helpless to render aid and that really stinks.

Regarding PFDs, the ONLY PFD that would have any sure chance of saving him if unconscious, or anyone else if unconcious, is a USCG Approved Type I vest. It's the only one that will turn you face up and keep your nose and mouth out of the water without intervention. The problem is that few wear them or even own them which is a shame. The Type I vest won't keep you warm while unconscious in frigid water, but at least it prevents you trying to breath water. If you own a PFD, try it. If you own one of those skinny little Class IV auto inflating CO2 "straps" good luck with that if you sieze or convulse and flip yourself into the water. They help with treading water, but that's about it from a practical standpoint. It's easy to burn a bottle of gas and try it out. You should anyway just so you understand how it works and its limitations. Seriously.

Sadly, too, most kayakers never even bother to practice re-entering their yak after turtling or inverting their boat in various conditions. It is a learned skill that is easily acquired and practiced. One among us in the kayak fishing comunity is a 77 year old lady who practices reentering her yak regularly without assistance. It took her awhile to learn the right technique for her physique, but she learned it.

We are very fortunate to have some of the best paddling safety instructors in the country here. If you kayak, you should seek out this training, it only takes a partial day or two. You should do it for your loved ones, and your friends, if not yourself.

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Posted · Report post

According to the news report (which are often error-filled) the "kid" was his adult step-daughter, who also ended up hospitalized. I didn't think of the seizure/heart attack scenario, but it makes sense. It's such a small body of water, I don't see how someone with the least bit of physical ability couldn't hang onto the side of the yak and doggie paddle to the nearest shore, if nothing else. I know it's been cold lately, but it's not like we're talking about Bering Sea hypothermia or anything.

georeyna and Baytown Bert like this

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Posted · Report post

Hypothemia can occur with prolonged exposure to cool water. It doesn't take much to become confused, sluggish, and lose the use of your hands and feet. :disappoint:

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Posted · Report post

I used to live in the Seattle area, and people die every summer from hypothermia in Puget Sound. Hypothermia experts have suggested that it is probably easier to survive the sudden shock of near freezing water (than moderate but low temperatures).

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Posted · Report post

Because follow-up to these kinds of stories rarely happens, we may never know what actually happened. Medical emergency is one possibility, but so is panic. A moderate-lever swimmer who suddenly finds himself in cold, murky water without a PFD, can suffer an inability to cope with his situation in a very short period of time. Fear, disorientation and lack of judgement skills (or as KeyResults mentions, simple practice) can all result in a drowning senerio, in not very deep water, close to shore. While many of us think of panic as the wild waving of hands pictured in movies, our bodies often shut down and appear calm, just before going under.

I was a lifeguard and water safety instructor for a number of years (let the certification pass, but that's what happens when you get old) and managed three actual lifesaving situations. One was the active sort and I used a flotation device between me and the somewhat-crazed swimmer (who may or may not have been in actual trouble, but you have to treat it as such). The other two were blue, placid and in imminent danger of drowning without assisstance. In both situations there were others around and closer to the victims than me, but because they displayed no obvious signs of alarm, went unnoticed.

My advice, always wear pfds when on the water, especially if you are an inexperienced swimmer, and always have an emergency plan.

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Posted · Report post

I have 3 PFD's, two type 1 and one type 5.

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Posted · Report post

To be honest, Bert, the type V is essentially a loophole and a decoration that keeps you from getting a ticket, IMHO.

I wear a type V on super calm hot days fishin the flats in 2ft deep, 87F, water for miles around me in my yak but only if I'm fishing with another (my BFF) and I always have a throwable Type I at hand tethered to yak.

When I'm offshore in YAK, I use TYPE I, same in Bays, marshes, lakes and or paddling alone or away from others...Type I, until I beach the yak and am on Terra Firma. One more thing, anytime near any kind of a Pass or periods of strong tidal movement or in inclement weather...Type I :)

It's super common to flip your kayak. It happens to even the most experienced paddlers eventually. If it hasn't happen to u yet, just wait, your time is a coming

WHEN that time comes, perhaps when you least expect it, in your single or double seater, you'll calmly right the boat, and gather your tethered stuff, curse a little for untethered stuff now likely lost, then hop back in the Yak (cuz u practiced this under these very paddling conditions I.e.,4ft swells in 26ft depth near High Island, etc.

Sorry about soapbox on this topic my friends. I don't want to lose any more friends to an easily preventable cause.

PEACE

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Posted · Report post

It is easy to find yourself in a difficult situation. Once while fishing Ihad caught a big redfish while standing on a sandbar in Matagorda Island. As I was crossing the end of the sandbar it was like quicksand and I fell over under that shallow water. My waders filled with water and held me down. Lucky a good friend saw me and rushed to lift me out of the water.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

I fellow I work with almost died wade fishing. Got into water too deep and he got caught in an undertow. The rip tide washed him up on the jetty rocks where someone was able to help him out of the water with only cuts, scrapes and bruises.

I have to admit I didn't know anything about PFD's when I bought my kayak. I just bought one that looked comfortable, was rated for my weight and was... uh... slightly stylish. I had to go check just now and it is a Type 3 and is actually a ski vest. It's also awfully hot in the summertime. I think I'll go shop for a quality Type 1 vest.

Edited by HoustonControl
KeyResults likes this

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Posted · Report post

I love fly fishing rivers, streams, and creeks in the Rockies. Some rivers, like the Arkansas River near Buena Vista CO is pretty big water with class IV rapids making it popular w tubers and "REAL KAYAKERS" you know, the Olympic sit inside guys wearing helmets and stuff. Its big water. 1000-1200 cfs which means if you slip and fall in while wading then you're going for a ride! This is made all the more difficult in waders, vest full of stuff, and your grandpa's irreplaceable Tonkin cane rod and Able reel. I've taken the toss a few times. It's kinda scary as you try to keep feet down current and avoid large stones etc. eventually you come to a bend and you can usually grab something and work your way to the bank or some shoals and regroup. If you're not wearing a belt tight above your waist, your waders fill almost instantaneously when u fall and all bets are off. It seems at least once every season some wading fisherman dies on a co stream or river and they almost never have a belt on.

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Posted · Report post

Excellent advice all and I take it to heart. I think I'll stick with the Type 1 and I've practiced "swimming onto my Ocean Kayak in my pool, but need to do it again and make my Bride do it too, now that she is going with me and I need to be wearing the PFD at the same time. When we did the nighttime paddling event recently, 3 different times, we hit something in the dark that almost made us feel like we would tip over.

To be honest, Bert, the type V is essentially a loophole and a decoration that keeps you from getting a ticket, IMHO.

I wear a type V on super calm hot days fishin the flats in 2ft deep, 87F, water for miles around me in my yak but only if I'm fishing with another (my BFF) and I always have a throwable Type I at hand tethered to yak.

When I'm offshore in YAK, I use TYPE I, same in Bays, marshes, lakes and or paddling alone or away from others...Type I, until I beach the yak and am on Terra Firma. One more thing, anytime near any kind of a Pass or periods of strong tidal movement or in inclement weather...Type I :)

It's super common to flip your kayak. It happens to even the most experienced paddlers eventually. If it hasn't happen to u yet, just wait, your time is a coming

WHEN that time comes, perhaps when you least expect it, in your single or double seater, you'll calmly right the boat, and gather your tethered stuff, curse a little for untethered stuff now likely lost, then hop back in the Yak (cuz u practiced this under these very paddling conditions I.e.,4ft swells in 26ft depth near High Island, etc.

Sorry about soapbox on this topic my friends. I don't want to lose any more friends to an easily preventable cause.

PEACE

KeyResults likes this

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Posted · Report post

That's terrible news. That lake is right next to the church where our boy scout troop meets. It's scary to think how fast things can change and you can end up in real trouble.

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Posted · Report post

<snip>If you're not wearing a belt tight above your waist, your waders fill almost instantaneously when u fall and all bets are off. It seems at least once every season some wading fisherman dies on a co stream or river and they almost never have a belt on.

Thanks for the info. I doubt I would have thought about wearing a tight belt when wearing waders.

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