Jump to content


Photo

I think I am ready to hide my first cache....


  • Please log in to reply
31 replies to this topic

#1 chringuyen86

chringuyen86

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 71 posts
  • LocationCypress, Texas

Posted 01 February 2014 - 11:16 PM

I have found about 77 caches so far (been actively caching since Dec 2013) and am really interested in hiding a few! Is there any advice you would have for me or would have any suggestions? Sorry for all the dumb questions 😒

#2 cachestacker

cachestacker

    Senior Member

  • Senior Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,043 posts
  • LocationClear Lake

Posted 01 February 2014 - 11:28 PM

BEFORE YOU SUBMIT:  Take the coords you came up with.  Plug them into Google Earth or Google Maps and look at the sat view.  Does it match up with where it really is?  If not, your coords are off and you need to re-check.

 

Consider taking an experienced cacher with you to tag along on your first hide.  You'll get confirmation you're doing it right.  ;)  (Or help to do it right, depending.)


Edited by cachestacker, 01 February 2014 - 11:29 PM.

  • green-eyed and chringuyen86 like this
Posted Image

#3 green-eyed

green-eyed

    Senior Member

  • Senior Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 645 posts
  • LocationLeague City

Posted 02 February 2014 - 02:21 AM

yep. what cachestacker said.


the crazy lady often found caching in a dress and heels...
Posted Image

#4 Baytown Bert

Baytown Bert

    Short fat dude with good hygiene

  • Senior Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,358 posts
  • LocationBaytown, Texas

Posted 02 February 2014 - 04:53 AM

There are no dumb questions.

Tell the experienced cacher they can sign the log THIRD TO FIND. This way the FTF and 2TF folks won't feel ripped off. There is no glory in 3TF's that I know of. They can also confirm your container will stand up to the task.

I always ask myself when placing a cache if I would be uncomfortable looking for one in this location and I'm not talking about in thorns or up in a tree.

Some cachers are great about adding something special to the cache for FTF, like a silver dollar, or a pathtag. You may consider doing this.

Next, consider how easy it will be for you to do maintenance. The bane of our game is unrepaired or abandoned caches. If you choose to contribute to the game by hiding a cache, stand in front of a mirror and repeat these words, "The day I can't repair it in a timely manner, I archive it." and you will score major points with those of us that live by this creed.

If there are known hazards such as thorns, poison ivy, slipping hazards, or the possibility a child could get harmed, add it in the description and select the appropriate attributes. I had one cache that 3 differant people were stung by bumble bees. I could have raised the ratings, but I didn't feel like it was safe for all cachers to try, as an allergic reaction could kill someone, so I moved the cache.

One more thing to consider is that if you place a cache down a dirt road and there are no other caches nearby (take the Anahuac area for instance), it is just as easy to maintain five caches out there as it is one and will attract many more people to the area than a lone cache.

Good fortune on your hide and BTW, don't be surprised if a few people find it and then it languishes. Many newer cachers place a cache and then expect there to be a line in front of it of people signing the log.
  • cachestacker, Dhaulaghiri and chringuyen86 like this

TXGA SETX Representative


#5 Mr Muddy Buddy

Mr Muddy Buddy

    Senior Member

  • Senior Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4,192 posts
  • LocationThe Middle of Nowhere, in the Great State of Confusion

Posted 02 February 2014 - 08:48 AM

Solve all of the puzzle caches within 2 miles of your proposed coordinates.   ^-^

There just might be a puzzle cache too close to where you want to place your hide.


  • KeyResults and Dhaulaghiri like this
Posted Image

#6 TAZ427

TAZ427

    Senior Member

  • Senior Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 443 posts
  • LocationSugar Land, TX

Posted 02 February 2014 - 09:01 AM

Follow the rules posted by GC.com.  As you probably know by now, it cannot be any closer than 528 feet of an existing cache final.  You CAN put it close to a puzzle cache original coordinates as long it's not within the 528' of the puzzles final location, hence Muddy Buddy's advice.

 

If you're using a Smart Phone to take the coordinates, I'd recommend using an App that averages the coordinates over time with many samples.  For Droid phones, there's an App called 'GPS Averaging' by Destil.  It's free, and pretty good.  I use this as well as my GPSr's averaging feature and then I double check on Google Sat/Earth views.

 

I'd also recommend cutting and pasting the coordinates from when you check it on Google Sat/Earth view straight into the cache submission form.  This avoids the unintentional transposing of digits.

 

Good Luck!


  • chringuyen86 likes this

Posted Image Posted Image


#7 HoustonControl

HoustonControl

    Charter Member

  • Senior Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 9,933 posts
  • LocationBaytown

Posted 02 February 2014 - 09:45 AM

What they all said.  Read more here:  http://www.geocachin...out/hiding.aspx

 

And use a good container.  It doesn't have to be expensive, just something with a seal to keep out water (we get a lot of rain around here).  You've probably found enough to know what works and what doesn't, but here are some suggestions.  For micro containers, old prescription pill bottles or waterproof matchstick holders are good inexpensive options. (I prefer the orange matchstick holders from Wal Mart over the green ones from Academy, FWIW).  I usually don't bother with putting the log in a plastic bag on these small ones because it ends up getting all crumpled up after about 3 people have found it and doesn't seal anyway.  Avoid 35mm film canisters, Altoid tins or other "leaky" containers unless they're in a spot out of the weather to begin with.

 

For larger containers, Lock-n-locks work well.  Old plastic jars with a screw-on lid that still has the seal in the lid are OK, as long as they didn't contain food (the food smell will attract animals that may chew a hole in the lid).  I've had good luck with Taster's Choice coffee containers because, again, they have a seal in the lid.  Avoid gladware, tupperware and "regular" coffee cans with the snap-on lid.

 

I look forward to finding your cache!


  • chringuyen86 likes this
img.aspx?txt=What+in+the+Hell?&uid=1dd8c

#8 chringuyen86

chringuyen86

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 71 posts
  • LocationCypress, Texas

Posted 03 February 2014 - 09:32 PM

thanks for all the advices :) I believe I am going to attended Baytown Bert 101 classes first then probably hide one :)
  • Kirbydox, cachestacker, KeyResults and 3 others like this

#9 SockPuppet

SockPuppet

    Actor

  • Senior Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 6,815 posts

Posted 03 February 2014 - 09:52 PM

Like real estate. Location, location, location. Decided the appropriate size container. Add log ans swag if large enough. Consider FTF prize. COme up with cache name. Copy someone elses HTML as a template. Edit template. preview. Verify coordinates via google aerial photos. Submit cache. Maintain cache.


Edited by SockPuppet, 03 February 2014 - 09:53 PM.

  • chringuyen86 likes this
Posted Image

#10 chringuyen86

chringuyen86

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 71 posts
  • LocationCypress, Texas

Posted 16 February 2014 - 04:17 PM

Is there any rules on putting it on a property? lets say for example I was going to used my neighbors tree and they it was ok with using there tree.


Edited by chringuyen86, 16 February 2014 - 04:21 PM.


#11 TexasWriter

TexasWriter

    Senior Member

  • Senior Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 977 posts
  • LocationHouston, TX

Posted 16 February 2014 - 04:40 PM

I'll weigh in on this one. There are tons of great places to hide caches that don't involve people's private property, and unless there is something extremely unique and fascinating about an object on private property, I would avoid it at all costs. Because times change, neighbors come and go, and geocachers come and go, many geocachers will either be extremely uncomfortable hunting one on private property or just downright won't hunt it at all. Many of us have had bad experiences with such caches (e.g. see the last few logs on http://coord.info/GC3KRCZ before it was archived....I know some of these guys were packing guns even though they didn't bring them out....thankfully). Unless it's at the CO's house/property and I know the CO personally (e.g. GC4884H), I won't even bother stopping personally. I've been swarmed by police twice (and approached many more times than that), nearly attached by a half dozen long-haired angry rednecks (as described in the link above), and had two paramilitary jerks come flying over a curb in a dually pickup truck fishtailing through the grass toward us (see http://coord.info/GC3XPD6). These are only the most outstanding ones....there have been others....and I'm not anxious to repeat any of these incidents or anything like them....There are way too many other options available out there.


  • Baytown Bert likes this

Deep Woods Off....my most commonly used cologne...

 

img.aspx?txt=View+my+profile&uid=90f8013


#12 KeyResults

KeyResults

    Senior Member

  • Senior Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,319 posts
  • LocationTomball

Posted 16 February 2014 - 05:47 PM

For every front yard geocache I've found, I've been uncomfortable despite the description stating that the owner and all the neighbors know about it.

 

Twice, I've managed to get the one suspicious neighbor that didn't get the memo and "never heard of such a thing as geocaching"

 

That said, there is an attribute for this and with permission it is technically allowed. You just need to ask yourself how awkward it could possibly get for a complete stranger with a flashlight...? ;)

 

I've often thought it would be really cool to put a contact's real name and telephone number in the description and hint in the event of neighbor questions


Edited by KeyResults, 16 February 2014 - 05:49 PM.

Why am I all sweatty and late? Umm...

#13 Cache Control

Cache Control

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 188 posts

Posted 16 February 2014 - 08:40 PM

For every front yard geocache I've found, I've been uncomfortable despite the description stating that the owner and all the neighbors know about it.

 

Twice, I've managed to get the one suspicious neighbor that didn't get the memo and "never heard of such a thing as geocaching"

 

That said, there is an attribute for this and with permission it is technically allowed. You just need to ask yourself how awkward it could possibly get for a complete stranger with a flashlight...? ;)

 

I've often thought it would be really cool to put a contact's real name and telephone number in the description and hint in the event of neighbor questions

I would like to add.  Even if you say only during day time.  Not all cachers ready any thing more than there is a cache there.So I would say stay away from some ones yard unless its 1400 acre's are something close.



#14 chringuyen86

chringuyen86

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 71 posts
  • LocationCypress, Texas

Posted 16 February 2014 - 08:41 PM

thanks for the advice everyone :)

#15 chringuyen86

chringuyen86

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 71 posts
  • LocationCypress, Texas

Posted 22 February 2014 - 09:12 AM

I just hid my first cache, so if you come across it please tell me what needs improving and what not!
  • cachestacker likes this

#16 GASTX

GASTX

    Senior Member

  • Senior Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 458 posts
  • LocationHumble, Texas

Posted 22 February 2014 - 01:20 PM

Let us know the GC number once it is posted, that way TexasWriter can get one step closer to 9K by his birthday. Since he is only slightly goal oriented the 8K goal he originally set was far to low.  Weeeeeeeeee!


  • TexasWriter likes this
Posted Image

#17 chringuyen86

chringuyen86

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 71 posts
  • LocationCypress, Texas

Posted 24 February 2014 - 12:04 AM

Let us know the GC number once it is posted, that way TexasWriter can get one step closer to 9K by his birthday. Since he is only slightly goal oriented the 8K goal he originally set was far to low. Weeeeeeeeee!

I'm pretty sure TexasWriter will be getting a notification when it comes available 😉 since he is FTF for a lot of the caches!!!!

#18 Mudfrog

Mudfrog

    Senior Member

  • Senior Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 295 posts
  • LocationLumberton, Texas

Posted 24 February 2014 - 08:38 AM

I know you already hid your first cache but i still want to add something.

 

First off,  Don't listen to anyone on these forums. They are amateurs and have no idea what they're talking about. Below is a list of dos and don'ts. Follow these and you'll be loved by police, property owners, and fellow cachers.

 

1. Decide where you want to place the cache. Doesn't matter where you decide so simply pick out a spot and hide the smallest size container you can find. Railroad tracks, schools, banks, federal buildings, and refineries are perfect locations.

 

2. Nix the idea of actually asking for permission to hide your cache. Corporations and property owners all know about geocaching and welcome it into their lives.

 

3. Pick out your container. Doesn't matter what you use but do make sure it can hold something for finders to write their names on. Used tissue paper works great and serves two purposes. It doesn't take up much room in the container and for some reason, finders seem to want to get their names on it quickly. This helps by getting them away from the hiding spot before muggles see what they're doing.

 

4. Once you have the spot and the container picked out, simply throw it out your car window while looking at your gpsr with one eye closed. Don't worry about that gpsr averaging nonsense as it only slows you down. A second or two is all it takes to get coordinates.

 

5. Now it's time to write up your cache description. While some people enjoy writing interesting and informative descriptions, i think it's a waste of time. You can write something like "enjoy" or "watch out for muggles" which is about all that is needed.

 

6. Once you do the above, you're ready to submit your cache to gc.com. The way i do it seems to get good results. I first email Prime Reviewer with my demands. He sometimes wants to cause grief by asking questions but i have found that threatening to take my business to OC.com seems to satisfy his curiosity. This works great as my caches are usually published within seconds of me submitting them.

 

I hope this helps,,,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

p.s. I was kidding. Please. please, please,,, Take heed in what the others above me said. You can't go wrong with their advice.


  • green-eyed and chringuyen86 like this

#19 chringuyen86

chringuyen86

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 71 posts
  • LocationCypress, Texas

Posted 24 February 2014 - 08:48 AM

I know you already hid your first cache but i still want to add something.

First off, Don't listen to anyone on these forums. They are amateurs and have no idea what they're talking about. Below is a list of dos and don'ts. Follow these and you'll be loved by police, property owners, and fellow cachers.

1. Decide where you want to place the cache. Doesn't matter where you decide so simply pick out a spot and hide the smallest size container you can find. Railroad tracks, schools, banks, federal buildings, and refineries are perfect locations.

2. Nix the idea of actually asking for permission to hide your cache. Corporations and property owners all know about geocaching and welcome it into their lives.

3. Pick out your container. Doesn't matter what you use but do make sure it can hold something for finders to write their names on. Used tissue paper works great and serves two purposes. It doesn't take up much room in the container and for some reason, finders seem to want to get their names on it quickly. This helps by getting them away from the hiding spot before muggles see what they're doing.

4. Once you have the spot and the container picked out, simply throw it out your car window while looking at your gpsr with one eye closed. Don't worry about that gpsr averaging nonsense as it only slows you down. A second or two is all it takes to get coordinates.

5. Now it's time to write up your cache description. While some people enjoy writing interesting and informative descriptions, i think it's a waste of time. You can write something like "enjoy" or "watch out for muggles" which is about all that is needed.

6. Once you do the above, you're ready to submit your cache to gc.com. The way i do it seems to get good results. I first email Prime Reviewer with my demands. He sometimes wants to cause grief by asking questions but i have found that threatening to take my business to OC.com seems to satisfy his curiosity. This works great as my caches are usually published within seconds of me submitting them.

I hope this helps,,,









p.s. I was kidding. Please. please, please,,, Take heed in what the others above me said. You can't go wrong with their advice.

hah....I love your advices and I will take it in consideration 😜

#20 TexasWriter

TexasWriter

    Senior Member

  • Senior Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 977 posts
  • LocationHouston, TX

Posted 24 February 2014 - 01:37 PM

I know you already hid your first cache but i still want to add something.

 

First off,  Don't listen to anyone on these forums. They are amateurs and have no idea what they're talking about. Below is a list of dos and don'ts. Follow these and you'll be loved by police, property owners, and fellow cachers.

 

1. Decide where you want to place the cache. Doesn't matter where you decide so simply pick out a spot and hide the smallest size container you can find. Railroad tracks, schools, banks, federal buildings, and refineries are perfect locations.

 

2. Nix the idea of actually asking for permission to hide your cache. Corporations and property owners all know about geocaching and welcome it into their lives.

 

3. Pick out your container. Doesn't matter what you use but do make sure it can hold something for finders to write their names on. Used tissue paper works great and serves two purposes. It doesn't take up much room in the container and for some reason, finders seem to want to get their names on it quickly. This helps by getting them away from the hiding spot before muggles see what they're doing.

 

4. Once you have the spot and the container picked out, simply throw it out your car window while looking at your gpsr with one eye closed. Don't worry about that gpsr averaging nonsense as it only slows you down. A second or two is all it takes to get coordinates.

 

5. Now it's time to write up your cache description. While some people enjoy writing interesting and informative descriptions, i think it's a waste of time. You can write something like "enjoy" or "watch out for muggles" which is about all that is needed.

 

6. Once you do the above, you're ready to submit your cache to gc.com. The way i do it seems to get good results. I first email Prime Reviewer with my demands. He sometimes wants to cause grief by asking questions but i have found that threatening to take my business to OC.com seems to satisfy his curiosity. This works great as my caches are usually published within seconds of me submitting them.

 

I hope this helps,,,

 

p.s. I was kidding. Please. please, please,,, Take heed in what the others above me said. You can't go wrong with their advice.

 

Thanks for the great lunch-time chuckle, Glenn. I know a few cachers who seem to have followed those guidelines at one point or another...


Deep Woods Off....my most commonly used cologne...

 

img.aspx?txt=View+my+profile&uid=90f8013





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users