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Getting to Know Your Fellow Cachers: What are you reading? Fiction


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#41 zoothornrollo

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Posted 01 October 2009 - 01:06 PM

I'm re-reading, but if I remember correctly, it does come up...

#42 bografan

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Posted 02 October 2009 - 06:03 AM

I like Lamb A LOT. It echos the John Prine song "Jesus: The Missing Years". Good stuff.
    Moore's Practical Demonkeeping, The Lust Lizard of Melancholy Cove, and The Stupidest Christmas Angel are all good ones as well.

Just finished rereading Patriots: Surviving the Coming Collapse by John Westley Rawles, and am about to re-read House of Leaves. If you like weird, check out Chuck Palahniuk's Survivor -or- Rant.

Then, for espionage/spy/action stuff, I do some Dean Ing (Soft Targets, Systemic Shock) here and there-- Small paperbacks that I can blow through in a day between heavier reads.

#43 cook cachers

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Posted 02 October 2009 - 06:44 PM

Okay now, bografan is starting to scare me.  :D

For any Conroy fans, I just finished South of Broad and it is vintage. Love him or hate him, the man can turn a phrase. And while I knew how the book would end less than 100 pages in, took nearly a month to read, just to savor the thick as molassas rhythm and his 1/2 decade interval between books.

#44 Cachin Shark

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Posted 02 October 2009 - 07:32 PM

I've been mostly reading short stories lately. Some were good, some not so much........ The Lottery is a creepy story.  :o

#45 Snoogans

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Posted 03 October 2009 - 07:32 AM

I've been mostly reading short stories lately. Some were good, some not so much........ The Lottery is a creepy story.  :o


My favorite short stories are:

"Orange is for Anguish, Blue for Insanity," by David Morrell. (BTW - I've been planning a cache with the same name for about 6 years now. It's gonna be a maintenance nightmare and might not last long.)

and

"I Have No Mouth and I Must Scream," by Harlan Ellison. (That one would make a great movie but it would have to be NC-17 rated.)

#46 Lefty Writer

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Posted 03 October 2009 - 09:24 AM

Right now I'm reading Hypersonic Thunder, which is 3rd in a series by Walter Boyne.
carpe cerevisi

#47 bbqbob2

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Posted 15 September 2010 - 08:07 PM

Dusting off another old and dear thread: I've been reading and enjoying Bernard Cornwell's Sharpe novels and his Archer series. Thoroughly well-written. He has a pretty set recipe that he follows, but the history you learn is worth it. If you like English -killing-French books, these are great. And now I'm primed for the Follett books.

#48 HoustonControl

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Posted 25 August 2011 - 10:15 PM

Reviving a dormant thread...

A couple that were traveling with us on our tour of Spain last fall gave me a paperback to read called Thunder in the Capital, by Rob Shumaker.  The author just happens to be their son.  It was a pretty good political thriller/page-turner -- if you're a conservative that is.  The hero is a Repubilcan and the villians are all, well... you get the picture. 

The couple that gave it to me are from Danville, Ill.  It was a few weeks after we got back that I began reading the book.  Somewhere in the book the author mentions Danville, Ill. and my first thought was, "What a coincidence!  The Shumakers from our trip were from Danville and ......  oh, yeah".

They sent me the sequel in the mail, and then the third installment.  They mentioned that he included Tangier, Morocco as a location in the third book because of our stop there on the Spain tour.  Sure enough, weeks go by and I'm reading the book and the scene moves to Tangier and my first thought was, "What a coincidence!  We visited Tangier....."  :D :D
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#49 ggmorton

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Posted 26 August 2011 - 09:01 AM

I'm currently reading the novel, "The Goal" by Eliyahu M. Goldratt as part of a business class in Productions & Operation Management.

http://en.wikipedia....he_Goal_(novel)


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#50 Betty Draper

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Posted 26 August 2011 - 09:18 AM

I'm currently reading the novel, "The Goal" by Eliyahu M. Goldratt as part of a business class in Productions & Operation Management.

http://en.wikipedia....he_Goal_(novel)


You confused me for a minute. You never struck me as a novel kind of guy. It is an assignment.  O0

#51 TheNorman

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Posted 26 August 2011 - 12:14 PM

I'm currently reading Cannery Row.  Earlier this summer I realized that I had never read "The Grapes of Wrath" and current U.S. conditions prompted me to read that.  The actual book was also bundled with "The Long Valley" (so I read it too).

#52 cook cachers

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Posted 26 August 2011 - 01:05 PM

I'm currently reading Cannery Row.  Earlier this summer I realized that I had never read "The Grapes of Wrath" and current U.S. conditions prompted me to read that.  The actual book was also bundled with "The Long Valley" (so I read it too).


My daughter was supposed to read The Scarlet Letter in English this year, but they have switched to The Grapes of Wrath for the same reason.

#53 HLLorelei

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Posted 26 August 2011 - 06:26 PM

I spent the day reading  "The Cowboy Gingerbread Man".  After reading it 7 times I may dream "Giddy-up giddy=up!!! ..."  At least 150+ children were entertained and I was able to springboard it into genre discussion. (Not bad for the first Friday of school!)  ;D  :P ;D :P

#54 JustKeely

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Posted 26 August 2011 - 09:25 PM

I recently enjoyed reading Abraham Verghese's Cutting for Stone and Little Bee, by Chris Cleave.  Both books made me appreciate more how difficult life in third world countries is, and how privileged we are here in America.  They also both demonstrate both the strength and the frailty of human relationships.
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#55 cook cachers

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Posted 26 August 2011 - 09:58 PM

LOL... I read Little Bee in the Spring and Cutting for Stone is my next book... we are like sin twisters!

#56 heftydude

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Posted 27 August 2011 - 07:55 AM

I've just read a few Lee Child novels, and want to read the rest of his Jack Reacher character novels.

Right now, I'm re-reading a funny and irreverant novel, Lamb: The Gospel According to Biff, Christ's Childhood Pal.


That book was hilarious!  While irreverent, please notice that Christ never sins in that book.  It's always Biff. It's been some years since I read that one, but my wife was annoyed with me reading it in bed because I would just burst out laughing and wake her up.
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#57 heftydude

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Posted 27 August 2011 - 07:58 AM

I bought The Pillars of the Earth by Follett at our library's used bookstore and have it  on my "to read" pile...glad to hear it is a good read.
--Mrs. Zoot

It's been about 15 years (or more?) since I read the first one.  I may have gotten it as a college graduation gift. The only book to actually bring tears to my eyes.  A truly great book.  I bought the Blu-Ray but haven't watch it yet.  I also haven't had  a chance to pick up the second book, but it is on the list.
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#58 heftydude

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Posted 27 August 2011 - 08:08 AM

I just finished the Girl with a Dragon Tattoo trilogy which was way better than I thought it was going to be (I tend to assume that if everyone is reading something then it must be watered down garbage).  Next on my list is William Gibson's latest "Zero History".  I've been a fan of his ever since I read "Neuromancer" in college.

For the historical fiction fans out there, I recommend The Alchemist by Caleb Carr.  The second book Angel of Darkness wasn't as good. but is still a worthwhile read.  While not truly a historical novel, I also enjoyed Quincunx by Charles Palliser.
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#59 Mr. ZHR

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Posted 27 August 2011 - 09:26 AM

Just finished Creighton's last book Pirate Latitudes.  It was a good read, as was Timeline, which I read recently.  Now to read Contagion, which I just found on our bookshelf... I won't have to see the movie now!

Still trying to figure out  don't like this new forum style.
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#60 TravelingGeek

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Posted 27 August 2011 - 11:42 PM

Girl with a Dragon Tattoo


O0 O0
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