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Getting to Know Your Fellow Cachers: What are you reading? Fiction


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#21 Donde Esta

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Posted 08 August 2009 - 09:53 PM

Thanks for the recommendation. I have it on the list. This caching stuff keeps intruding into my reading time.  :P

#22 Txsyank

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Posted 09 August 2009 - 08:02 AM


I also just finished Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett. Great epic tale set in 12th century England. O0


World Without End is even BETTER and is set 300 years later. The decendants of Tom Builder and others are in it. People didn't move around much back then.

The books made me understand life within the feudal system wayyy better than any text book ever did. O0



Follett is underated with his ability to generate historical fiction.  Until World without end came out, Pillars of the Earth was one of my most favorite books, now they both are.  Lie Down with Lions also another great one.

#23 GrangerFam

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Posted 09 August 2009 - 09:43 AM

I'm a fan of Conn Iggulden, who wrote the Dangerous Book for Boys, but also has written a historical fiction series on Julius Caesar and Genghis Khan, both of which are excellent.

I've read only one Chuck Palahniuk novel, Choke, which was interesting in a very adult way.  Haven't seen the movie they made out of it.  Not sure he's quite right...

The stories to which Snoogans refers sound interesting.

Perhaps I'll give them a read after I finish my current book on Alexander the Great.

Also, I will miss Michael Creighton (RIP).  He was a master of the techno thriller.

#24 georeyna

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Posted 09 August 2009 - 03:25 PM

I bought The Pillars of the Earth by Follett at our library's used bookstore and have it  on my "to read" pile...glad to hear it is a good read.
--Mrs. Zoot


I give both books two thumbs up.  This is what started be down the path of historical fiction in England/Europe.  I was reading alot of Civil war historical fiction but when I read the two books by Follett, I have not been able to go back to Civil War books -- yet.

Anya Seaton's Katherine has turned out to be a great read.  Now it is time to read all of Anya Seatons books.

#25 zoothornrollo

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Posted 09 August 2009 - 08:55 PM

Another historical fiction author I recommend is Edward Rutherfurd.  His books are long (900 to 1100 pages) but I find them very interesting.  He takes a location and tells a story of that place over centuries (example:  his book London begins in the days of the Roman Empire (54 BC) and ends in 1997.  The characters constantly change, but the setting is the same or rather, it evolves.  He wrote one called Sarum, another called Russka, and I seem to recall one called The Forest.
--Mrs. Zoot

#26 HoustonControl

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Posted 16 August 2009 - 12:08 PM

I downloaded the Kindle app to my iphone and then downloaded and read Paranoia by Joseph Finder.  I chose that book because it was near the top of the recommended list... oh, and it was free.  It was a good read -- a gripping tale of corporate espionage in the high tech industry -- though I was kind of confused on how it ended.

I like the Kindle app.  You can chose between 5 different text sizes and three text color combinations.  And you don't need a book light to read in the dark!  

I see they have the Kindle version of Pillars of the Earth for $6.39 on Amazon -- delivered wirelessly to my iphone.  Based on recommendations here, I think I'll try that one next.  O0
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#27 georeyna

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Posted 16 August 2009 - 07:35 PM

I downloaded the Kindle app to my iphone and then downloaded and read Paranoia by Joseph Finder.  I chose that book because it was near the top of the recommended list... oh, and it was free.  It was a good read -- a gripping tale of corporate espionage in the high tech industry -- though I was kind of confused on how it ended.

I like the Kindle app.  You can chose between 5 different text sizes and three text color combinations.  And you don't need a book light to read in the dark!  

I see they have the Kindle version of Pillars of the Earth for $6.39 on Amazon -- delivered wirelessly to my iphone.  Based on recommendations here, I think I'll try that one next.  O0


Do the books take up alot of space on the iphone?

#28 HoustonControl

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Posted 16 August 2009 - 08:34 PM

Do the books take up alot of space on the iphone?

They don't seem to.  It's just text, after all.  I guess I need to connect the phone to the computer and look at it through itunes to get the breakdown on space used.
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#29 Cachin Shark

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Posted 16 August 2009 - 09:14 PM

I'm currently reading "The Secret Life of Bees" by Sue Monk Kidd. I find that the first chapter was a bit hard to get into, but after that it's pretty good. I like the style of writing in it because it gives information and changes the subject without giving the full story. It makes it easy to continue reading so you can find out more, and it doesn't give all of the information and then start on a new topic. I have to say I was slightly surprised to find It is fairly enjoyable, but it's always nice to read a good book.

#30 georeyna

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Posted 17 August 2009 - 06:52 AM

I'm currently reading "The Secret Life of Bees" by Sue Monk Kidd. I find that the first chapter was a bit hard to get into, but after that it's pretty good. I like the style of writing in it because it gives information and changes the subject without giving the full story. It makes it easy to continue reading so you can find out more, and it doesn't give all of the information and then start on a new topic. I have to say I was slightly surprised to find It is fairly enjoyable, but it's always nice to read a good book.


I agree, this was a hard one for me to get into as well but did later find it enjoyable.

#31 HoustonControl

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Posted 07 September 2009 - 08:27 PM

Finished "Pillars of the Earth" -- good read.

The wife borrowed some books on CD from the library for our vacation -- John Grisham, Janet Evanovich, Dave Barry...

Dave Barry??  :o
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#32 TravelingGeek

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Posted 07 September 2009 - 11:49 PM

I read Pillars while recuperating from a back injury last year.  Great book; I really enjoyed the read.

No need to go into the details, but i was taking a number of prescription drugs and using lots of hydro-therapy sessions (baths) due to the nature of the injury.

One thing lead to another and I dumped the book in the drink.

You can't see the two high speed fans that are off camera to the right on the below photo but i think you can get the picture.

By the way, I would be happy to lend out this rig to any CO who needs to dry a log.

Cheers,
-TG

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#33 ohl hockey guy

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Posted 08 September 2009 - 10:41 AM

Everyone should read Final Approach. It is by a local author (a friend of mine) Rachel Brady. It is a fun quick read.
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#34 HoustonControl

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Posted 08 September 2009 - 10:48 AM

My "version" of The Pillars of the Earth.  Probably wouldn't like being dumped in the drink either...  :o



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#35 JustKeely

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Posted 08 September 2009 - 11:17 AM

I've been reading this series by Dana Fuller Ross, Wagons West!, about the early days of the American West.  Not terribly poignant writing or anything, but quick reads and interesting characters and situations.  I read a bunch last summer and got some more, but I am missing some of the books in the series and therefore some of the details about what happens.  Anyone else read this series, and if so, do you have Book 14, Missouri I think?
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#36 SockPuppet

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Posted 08 September 2009 - 11:33 AM

I have been reading some geocaching logs for fiction.
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#37 WTT-B2

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Posted 08 September 2009 - 12:02 PM

I've been reading this series by Dana Fuller Ross, Wagons West!, about the early days of the American West.  Not terribly poignant writing or anything, but quick reads and interesting characters and situations.  I read a bunch last summer and got some more, but I am missing some of the books in the series and therefore some of the details about what happens.  Anyone else read this series, and if so, do you have Book 14, Missouri I think?


I've read them all and enjoyed the series. Another good series is the "White Indian Series" I'll check on the "Missouri" book

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#38 Muddy Buddies

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Posted 08 September 2009 - 12:24 PM

I have been reading some geocaching logs for fiction.


From my recollection, you are pretty good at writing that fiction too.  :D
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#39 zoothornrollo

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Posted 01 October 2009 - 05:24 AM

I've just read a few Lee Child novels, and want to read the rest of his Jack Reacher character novels.

Right now, I'm re-reading a funny and irreverant novel, Lamb: The Gospel According to Biff, Christ's Childhood Pal.

#40 bbqbob2

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Posted 01 October 2009 - 12:27 PM

Does Biff mention any water to wine action?
Would have come in handy when I was a teenager.  ::)


Whoa, that was a close lightning strike!  :orelse:




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